20 dog breeds unfit for the child and the most aggressive (with pictures)


20 dog breeds unfit for the child and the most aggressive (with pictures)

If you are looking to adopt a dog, you know that there are many details to consider before you bring home a new pet. Do you have time to take your dog out for a walk multiple times a day? Does your schedule allow for you to be home in the evenings to feed and take your dog out? Do you have the time, patience, and money to train your dog?

One of the biggest questions you might be asking yourself is what breed of dog is best for you and your family. If you have children, you may be especially concerned with avoiding particularly aggressive dogs. In this article, we will discuss aggression in dogs and break down 20 of the most aggressive dog breeds in the world.

Aggression in Dogs

How, exactly, do we define aggression in dogs? When we discuss aggression, you may think we are talking exclusively about dogs that are likely to bite. However, other common behaviors such as growling and barking are also considered to be signs of aggression.

A particular breed’s level of aggression is usually determined through temperament testing. The American Temperament Testing Society test presents dogs with different stimuli to see how they perform in certain situations. These tests aren’t perfect and can’t determine for sure which breeds are aggressive and which are not, but they do offer insight into which breeds have a tendency to display aggressive behaviors.

Another important element to be aware of is prey drive. A dog with a high prey drive is likely to act on its hunting instincts when confronted with small animals, but this doesn’t mean that he is dangerous or aggressive. It is helpful to understand the difference because aggressive behavior toward humans is usually triggered by fear, not your dog’s hunting instinct. If you want your dog to stop chasing squirrels in the park, you will need to handle that differently than you would handle a dog who often growls and barks at visitors in your home.

Now that you understand what we mean by aggression and how it is measured, let’s take a closer look at specific breeds that may be likely to display aggressive behavior.

20 of the Most Aggressive Dog Breeds

1- German Shepherd
Image Credit: Rob Wee, Pixabay
Lifespan 12-14 years
Average Weight 48-70 pounds (females) or 66-88 pounds (males)
Average Height 22-24 inches (females) or 24-26 inches (males)

There’s a reason why German Shepherds are often used as police dogs. They are extremely intelligent, highly trainable, and athletic dogs. Their medium to large size and above-average strength makes them formidable opponents for intruders. These dogs also have very strong jaws; their bite is strong enough to break bones. It’s no surprise that an aggressive German Shepherd could pose a real danger.

Of course, German Shepherds are also very popular family dogs, and with the right training, they can make a wonderful addition to your home. The key is to ensure your dog is properly socialized from a young age. That way, he will understand that visitors are not intruders, but friends.

 

2- American Pit Bull Terrier

Image Credit: Joao Roda, Shutterstock

Lifespan 12-14 years
Average Weight 30-80 pounds
Average Height 17-19 inches

Generally speaking, Siberian Huskies exhibit aggressive behavior as a result of poor training. These dogs can be stubborn and pose challenges even for experienced dog owners. Siberian Huskies require persistent training, a lot of exercise, and plenty of social time with humans and other dogs. If you are a first-time dog owner or otherwise do not have the time to dedicate to a Siberian Husky’s training and care, you may want to consider adopting a different breed.

03- Siberian Husky

Lifespan 12-14 years
Average Weight 35-50 pounds (females) or 45-60 pounds (males)
Average Height 20-22 inches (females) or 21-23 inches (males)

Generally speaking, Siberian Huskies exhibit aggressive behavior as a result of poor training. These dogs can be stubborn and pose challenges even for experienced dog owners. Siberian Huskies require persistent training, a lot of exercise, and plenty of social time with humans and other dogs. If you are a first-time dog owner or otherwise do not have the time to dedicate to a Siberian Husky’s training and care, you may want to consider adopting a different breed.

 

04- Doberman Pinscher
Image Credit: patstatic, Pixabay
Lifespan 10-13 years
Average Weight 60-90 pounds (females) or 75-100 pounds (males)
Average Height 24-26 inches (females) or 26-28 inches (males)

Doberman Pinschers were originally bred as guard dogs and have been subsequently used as working dogs for police and military personnel. As such, they have a reputation for aggression that isn’t entirely undeserved; Dobermans may be aggressive toward people they don’t know out of fear or out of a desire to protect their owners. However, Dobermans are highly intelligent and trainable dogs, and with the proper training, they can be very friendly dogs. It is important to socialize your Doberman early on in order to teach them how to behave around new people.

05- Dachshunds
Image Credit congerdesign, Pixabay
Lifespan 12-16 years
Average Weight 16-32 pounds
Average Height 8-9 inches

Dachshunds may be small, but their bark is mighty. They tend to be most aggressive toward strangers, and though they probably can’t do much damage, persistent barking can become an issue. If you want to put an end to your Dachshund’s aggressive behavior, you need to train him the way you would train any larger breed.

06- Rottweiler
Image Credit: Roberto Mares, Pixabay
Lifespan 9-10 years
Average Weight 80-100 pounds (females) or 95-135 pounds (males)
Average Height 22-25 inches (females) or 24-27 inches (males)

It should come as no surprise that Rottweilers make the list. Like Pit Bulls, Rottweilers have a reputation for being aggressive. They are territorial dogs and tend to have the most problems with other dogs. They also aren’t necessarily well suited for households with other small pets because they tend to have a high prey drive. As a result, they will do best in a home where they are the only pet. However, in the right environment and with the proper socialization, Rottweilers can be great companions.